11 Comments

  1. Harry Highline
    5th June 2017 @ 9:55 am

    Despite the hatchet job inspired buy it’s competition, I think the new Lambretta is a winner, the styling of the exhaust is not the greatest but most riders tend to change it anyway. I particularly like the orange color as the black trim pieces looks far nicer than the over abundance of aluminum looking parts the other models tend to have. But each to their own. Would I buy one ? yes I will.

  2. Sean Roberts
    5th June 2017 @ 7:07 pm

    After some initial shock/horror, I tried to look beyond my bias towards original Lambrettas and found this was not that bad. The design of the frame is quite clever. Yes, it’s not a Lammy that we all know and love/hate. But there has to be some evolution to the brand. Doesn’t mean flying scooters “a la” Jetsons, but something practical. This should give Vespa a run for their money if they can get the mechanical gremlins sorted out (so many Scomadi owners flogging their 2 year old machines already – why is that?).

    A 200cc or higher model should help push sales and if they market the USA, they might be successful. So many GTS’s on the roads here due to higher engine displacement. Now if we can all upgrade our SX’s to 250 or 350 we wouldn’t need these modern versions, but there are mechanical limits to the older machines. Swapping out the Innocenti engine for a Yamaha engine or similar is a solution – but is it still a Lambretta or just in name only? Food for thought….

  3. Tim Boyle
    5th June 2017 @ 9:28 pm

    I really like it, I think the design team have done a good job looks cheeky, it has some desinctive Lambretta styling, frame looks good. Does look different to a classic Lambretta but should be welcomed at scooter clubs as are Scomadis and GTS’s . I’ll stick with my 1980 GP 200 but nice job. Some people will buy it, I reckon the girls will like it, great brand name retro styling and modern engineering should be easy to maintain and run. It’ll never be as much fun as a geared 2 stroke but that’s not for everyone as old Lambrettas need a lot of fiddling and fathering .

  4. Dave Southam
    5th June 2017 @ 9:40 pm

    If there’s one scooter that represents the evolution of what a 21st century Lambretta should look like then its a Scomadi.
    Lambretta GmbH have already been beaten off the start line for looks and probably power (Scomadi 200 is a 180cc)
    Still a newly produced scooter is good for choice and I’m sure it will attract sales.

  5. andyl
    6th June 2017 @ 6:49 pm

    Not a bad effort, but it is always going to be a struggle to do anything as good as a series 3 Lambretta. I’ve always preferred Lambrettas, but if I wanted a genuine Italian but modern scooter I’d buy a Vespa. It will be interesting to see if Brandconcern manage to wrestle the Lambretta name from SIL, if not Serveta is probably up for grabs…

  6. Dave D
    7th June 2017 @ 12:08 am

    i miss the 80s… No stupid eu bollocks or mid-life crisis clowns…

  7. Mal Nicholls
    7th June 2017 @ 1:04 am

    Seen it in the flesh and l
    Does not do the lambretta name justice from any angle . Like the Dutch but leave design to the Italians

  8. Hank Bajajman
    8th June 2017 @ 5:24 pm

    not too bad. but I suppose they’ll want 800 over the sym fiddle for a lammy badge

  9. Letitia Brooks
    10th June 2017 @ 8:55 pm

    Very Cento/Starstream like in IMHO.

    For me that is a good thing as a fan of smallframe Lammies.

    I emailed them last year and raged at them for not having a fixed mudguard, asserting that the Darwinesque evolutionary winners of the scooter world, Lambretta and Vespa were the apex predators because they were male and female forms, as in nature. A Lammy must have a fixed mudguard or it is a Lamby Polo…an ugly hybrid which lacks the beauty of both parents.

    Whatever, it is good to see more choice in quality retro styled scooters. Metal gets my vote over plastic anyday.

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